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first cycle
Western Gull
Figs 1 and 2) A fresh juvenile wymani. Note the overall dark face and upperparts. In flight, note the solid dark primaries and rather solid greater coverts. September 20, 1998. Ventura, California. Photos by Don DesJardin.

Figs 3 and 4) Juvenile occidentalis. These very sooty birds are fresh off the nest. August 19, 2011. Año Nuevo Island, California. Photo by Steve Hampton.



Fig 5) Juvenile occidentalis. Note the dark head, large bill, and solid outer greater coverts. September 8, 2013. Half Moon Bay, California. Photo by Steve Hampton.

Fig 6) Juvenile occidentalis. Note the dark primaries, dark greater covert bar, and solid black tail. September 22, 2013. Off Half Moon Bay, California. Photo by Steve Hampton.

Figs 7 and 8) This unusually white bird, even for spring, is presumably a Western Gull, at least based on location, as well as bill and head shape and the shade of "adult gray" on the back. There are some unusual characteristics of this bird: the pale barring on the outer rectrices is very unusual in Western; the pale pink legs were paler than adjacent Westerns; and the white head exceeds even typical second cycle Western in lack of markings. In flight, note the slight pale window of the inner primaries, not as strong as Herring, and seemingly within the range of Western. March 30, 1997. Ventura, California. Photos by Don DesJardin.