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adult
Glaucous-winged
Gull

Fig 1) This bird shows relatively light head markings. Note that the markings are smudges, sometimes forming fine horizontal barring. This is a great mark, as Glaucous-winged and hybrids with Western are just about the only large gull that do not have head streaking-- they have smudging instead. Note also the dark eye, rounded head, and heavy bill. The pale bill color with the dusky mark are typical in winter. December 1, 1998. Ventura, California. Photo by Don DesJardin.

Fig 2) Presumed female in comparison with presumed male Herring Gull. Note differences in head shape, bill color, head streaking, and mantle shade. November 18, 2013. Davis, California. Photo by Steve Hampton.


Figs 3, 4, and 5) The primary pattern on adult Glaucous-winged Gulls is tough to see in flight. It resembles that of Slaty-backed, with a string of pearls on P6-8. All photos February 2, 2012. Sausalito, California. Photos by Steve Hampton.

Fig 6) Note the dark eye, small dark mark near the red spot on the lower mandible, and head and breast smudging, not streaking. A second cycle Herring Gull is behind it. December 10, 2011. Davis, California. Photo by Steve Hampton.

Fig 7) Size comparison with Mew Gull. Note the dark mark on the bill and heavy structure. This bird has a fairly white head for the date. February 2, 2012. Sausalito, California. Photo by Steve Hampton.

Fig 8) This bird, largely in alternate plumage by March, has primaries that are slightly darker than the rest of the body. Drawing the line between what is pure and within the normal range is difficult, but this bird shows no other signs of hybridization. March 3, 2012. Davis, California. Photo by Steve Hampton.

Figs 9 and 10) The bird on the right is more advanced toward the breeding season, with a cleaner head and yellower bill. February 2, 2012. Sausalito, California. Photos by Steve Hampton.